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Arnold Shooters
Arnold Shooters

Bioshock Art Book Pdf Download



Deco Devolution: The Art of Biоshock 2 is part of the Bioshock 2 Collectors Edition. It is a book of concept art, development renders, and developer commentary that was shipped with the non-Standard Editions of BioShock 2.




Bioshock Art Book Pdf Download


Download File: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furlcod.com%2F2u9MXO&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw0OgGdAvZXNPvYH6H-Mh36p



This massive, official hardcover art book was only available for a short time with the release of BioShock 2, and is quite sought-after now. Containing 168 pages of gorgeous, full-color artwork from the game, fans will be delighted to find stunning concept paintings, detailed character and weapon designs, storyboards, a gallery of posters, and much more in this exhaustive volume. Accompanying the images are insights from the artists and developers themselves as they explain some of the lore behind the characters and what went into bringing this unique world to life. This is a must-have book for any fan of the games or of art deco art in general.


Deco Devolution The Art of Biоshock 2 is part of the Bioshock 2 Collectors Edition. It is a book of concept art, development renders, and developer commentary that was shipped with the non-Standard Editions of BioShock 2.


This massive, official hardcover artbook was only available for a short time with the release of BioShock 2, and is quite sought-after now. Containing 168 pages of gorgeous, full-color artwork from the game, fans will be delighted to find stunning concept paintings, detailed character and weapon designs, storyboards, a gallery of posters, and much more in this exhaustive volume. Accompanying the images are insights from the artists and developers themselves as they explain some of the lore behind the characters and what went into bringing this unique world to life. This is a must-have book for any fan of the games or of art deco art in general.


You can't have a big game released without a wallet-draining Collector's Edition, but Bioshock may be one of the first games to make fans ask to pay more for the game. After the fans convinced Irrational to make the special edition, they then voted on the contents, which were later revealed to be a Big Daddy action figure, a soundtrack CD, and a behind the scenes DVD. Good stuff, to be sure, but what about the art book?


The Art of BioShock Infinite is a book of production and concept art that was released February 27, 2013, after the release of BioShock Infinite. It was published by Dark Horse as a hardcover book and is currently priced at $39.99.[1]


A miniature edition for The Art of BioShock Infinite was announced to be included with both the Premium Edition and the Songbird Edition of BioShock Infinite. This 64-page collectible mini-edition of the artbook provides a substantial look at the full version, published by Dark Horse Books, and includes a hand-distressed blue linen hardcover with a gold leaf embroidered stamp of Columbia, written as "Columbia: Customs & Excise 1907".


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At this point in the development, the backdrop of Rapture had been fleshed out, but they had yet to come on how to represent the drones, protectors, and harvesters from their original game idea. The Big Daddy concept as the protector class was developed early in the process, but the team had yet to reach a satisfying design for the drones, having used several possible designs including bugs and dogs in wheelchairs.[28] The team wanted to have the player care for the drones in some way and create pathos for these characters. The idea of using little girls came out of brainstorming, but was controversial and shocking within the team at first, recognizing that they could easily be killed and make the game more horrific in the style of Night Trap.[28] However, as Levine worked on the story, he started to incorporate the ideas of dystopian and utopian thinkers from the twentieth century, including Ayn Rand, Aldous Huxley, and George Orwell, and considered their ideas "fascinating".[40] He brought in the ideas of Objectivism that Rand primarily outlined in the book Atlas Shrugged, that man should be driven by selfishness and not altruism, and used this to inform the philosophy behind the city of Rapture and Andrew Ryan's work, viewing them as quite ludicrous, and primed to be applied to an antagonist, tied in with his previous observations on Rockefeller and his writings.[28] This was extended to the use of the little girls as drones (now Little Sisters), particularly the question whether the player should try to save the girls or harvest the ADAM for their benefit.[28] 2K Games expressed concern about the initial mechanic of the Little Sisters, where the player would actively prey on the Little Sister, which would have alerted a Big Daddy and set up the fight with the player. This approach did not sit well with Levine, and 2K Games asserted that they would not ship a game "where the player gets punished for doing the right thing".[27] They altered this approach where the Little Sisters would be invulnerable until the player had dealt with their Big Daddy, though LeBreton considered this "a massive kludge" into the game's fiction.[27][28] The idea of creating the Little Sisters and presenting the player with this choice became a critical part of the game's appeal to the broader gaming market, although it was met with criticism from some outlets.[28] Levine desired only to have one ending to the game, something that would have left the fate of the characters "much more ambiguous", but publisher pressure directed them to craft multiple endings depending on the choice of harvesting Little Sisters.[39] Levine also noted that "it was never my intention to do two endings for the game. It sort of came very late and it was something that was requested by somebody up the food chain from me."[41]


Other elements came into the story design. Levine had an interest in "stem cell research and the moral issues that go around [it]".[40] Regarding artistic influences, Levine cited the books Nineteen Eighty-Four and Logan's Run, representing societies that have "really interesting ideas screwed up by the fact that we're people".[42] The idea of the mind control used on Jack was offered by LeBreton, inspired by films like The Manchurian Candidate, as a means to provide a better reason to limit the player's actions as opposed to the traditional use of locked doors to prevent them exploring areas they should not. The team had agreed that Jack's actions would be controlled by a key phrase but struggled with coming up with one that would not reveal Atlas' true nature. Levine happened upon "Would you kindly" after working on marketing materials for the game that asked the reader hypothetical questions such as "Would you kill people, even innocent people, to survive?", later working that phrase into the first script for the game.[27]


An initial demo of the game was made available in August 2007 for Xbox 360 and Microsoft Windows.[58][59][60] This demo included cutscenes to introduce the player to Rapture, the game's tutorial section, and its first levels; the demo also included weapons, plasmids, and tonics that would otherwise be introduced later in the full title, as to give the player more of the features that would be found in the published game.[5] The Xbox 360 demo was the fastest demo at that time to reach one million downloads on the Xbox Live service.[61] The full game was released for these platforms on August 21, 2007.


BioShock has received praise for its artistic style and compelling storytelling. In their book, Digital Culture: Understanding New Media, Glen Creeber and Royston Martin perform a case study of BioShock as a critical analysis of video games as an artistic medium. They praised the game for its visuals, sound, and ability to engage the player into the story. They viewed BioShock as a sign of the "coming of age" of video games as an artistic medium.[166] John Lanchester of the London Review of Books recognized BioShock as one of the first video games to break into coverage of mainstream media to be covered as a work of art arising from its narrative aspects, whereas before video games had failed to enter into the "cultural discourse", or otherwise covered due to moral controversies they created.[7] Peter Suderman for Vox in 2016 wrote that BioShock was the first game that demonstrated that video games could be a work of art, particularly highlighting that the game plays on the theme of giving the illusion of individual control.[14]


BioShock: Breaking the Mold, a book containing artwork from the game, was released by 2K Games on August 13, 2007. It is available in both low and high resolution, in PDF format from 2K Games' official website.[190][191] Until October 1, 2007, 2K Games was sending a printed version of the book to the owners of the collector's edition whose Big Daddy figurines had been broken, as compensation for the time it took to replace them.[192] On October 31, 2008, the winners of "Breaking the Mold: Developers Edition Artbook Cover Contest" were announced on cultofrapture.com.[193]


A prequel novel, titled BioShock: Rapture written by John Shirley, was published July 19, 2011. The prequel book details the construction of Rapture and the events leading to its demise. The book follows multiple BioShock characters.[194]


LUKE CUDDY is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Southwestern College in Chula Vista, CA. He edited The Legend of Zelda and Philosophy, World of Warcraft and Philosophy, and HALO and Philosophy. An avid guitar player as well as gamer, he continues to annoy his friends with impromptu performances of "Will the Circle Be Unbroken." WILLIAM IRWIN (series editor) is Professor of Philosophy at King's College, Wilkes-Barre, PA. He originated the philosophy and popular culture genre of books as co-editor of the bestselling The Simpsons and Philosophy, and has overseen titles including House and Philosophy, Batman and Philosophy, and Veronica Mars and Philosophy. Permissions Request permission to reuse content from this site


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